Q&A: Explain and Define the symbol of halo please!?

July 19, 2013 | By

Question by Aiewfj: Explain and Define the symbol of halo please!?
I need to know the brief history of the ring Halo that represents heaven and goodness! and also WHY the halo means goodness and more.
Just basic significant information about the Halo! (e.g. When Why What How)
Thank you ! I NEED IT ASAP!

Best answer:

Answer by Truprincess
It is the symbol for the aura of a person.

The Halo and the Circle
The halo is also connected to the Circle as a Christian Symbol symbolises eternity as it has no beginning or end. Many early Christians believed that there was something divine in circles. Early Astronomy and astrology was connected to the divine by most medieval scholars, the circular shape of the sun, moon and the planets were related to God's act of Creation. The luminous circle, usually prismatically colored, round the sun or moon are connected with halos.

The Meaning of the Halo as a Catholic Christian Symbol
The definition and the meaning of Symbols or Icon in early religious art forms. A Catholic sign or icon, such as the Halo Christian Symbol, is an object, character, figure, or color used to represent abstract ideas or concepts - a picture that represents an idea. A religious icon, such as the Halo Christian Symbol, is an image or symbolic representation with sacred significance. The Halo is is symbolic of divinity and supreme power. The Halo Christian Symbol an indication of radiant light drawn around the head of a saint. A bright ring represented in painting as surrounding the heads of saints and the whole bodies of other holy persons. Also referred to as an aura, corona, gloriole, glory, aureole or nimbus. The halo conveys the concept of transcendence of the physical body.

The halo is familiar in western iconography and culture as anything from a thin elliptical gold band encircling rapturous ladies in traditional painting, to golden crowns of monarchs (and Jesus’ crown of thorns), to monks’ tonsures to currently being a much-used framing device in less than reverend photography. In short it is a signifier of the bearer’s possession of unique, divine or spiritual qualities.

The halo varies in depiction from the aforementioned ethereal orbits to almost corporeal supra-cranial discs. It has had crosses incorporated in both Byzantine and Celtic contexts to represent the Trinity – the single but divided whole. It has been a soft focus glow, radiating rays and even triangles.
Halo Origins

The Inquisition set out to find the earliest use of a halo or aura as a visual device, but eventually had to give it up as a bad job; halos existed before they can be truly understood as such. Figures exist with light radiating from their heads in South American cultures, while the Egyptians placed complete and unbroken discs above the heads of their representations.

Definition & Meaning
According to the Penguin Dictionary of Symbols, “the halo, or nimbus, is a solar image which possesses much the same significance as the crown and specifically the kingly crown. It is displayed by a radiance around the head and sometimes around the whole body (a mandorla or aureola). This originally solar radiance is a sign of holiness, of sanctity and of the divine. It is a manifestation of the aura.” It goes on to clearly state that the halo is a representation of the emission of light.

The halo is familiar in western iconography and culture as anything from a thin elliptical gold band encircling rapturous ladies in traditional painting, to golden crowns of monarchs (and Jesus’ crown of thorns), to monks’ tonsures to currently being a much-used framing device in less than reverend photography. In short it is a signifier of the bearer’s possession of unique, divine or spiritual qualities.

The halo varies in depiction from the aforementioned ethereal orbits to almost corporeal supra-cranial discs. It has had crosses incorporated in both Byzantine and Celtic contexts to represent the Trinity – the single but divided whole. It has been a soft focus glow, radiating rays and even triangles.

The Earliest?
Well, its frankly impossible to directly attribute the halo’s inception to a certain culture, but it would seem the Egyptians were, if not the originators, then at least, among the earliest adopters. The Egyptian god Ra has the head of a falcon and the sun-disk of Wadjet above his head, in a very early form of halo

This would tie-in with the area’s familiarity with Zoroastrianism’s emphasis on flames and light as representative of divinity. The Hellenistic and Roman worlds retained the halo for their iconography. This was not just in their visual art – in the Illiad Homer described a supernatural light that frames the head sof warriors in battle. Of course that might just have been huge spatters of blood and gore, but who am I to doubt the veracity of a visual description made by a blind bronze age storyteller?

Interestingly, there exist many Asian representations of Buddha with a halo which are concurrent with Roman imagery, and are aesthetically closer to more modern interpretations. Although much later in date, masks in South America, as shown above also echo the halo. It is highly improbable these could have been influenced through pre-columbian contact

Give your answer to this question below!

Filed in: Weddings | Tags: , , , ,

Comments are closed.