Q&A: Is it normal for divorce children to have social issues several years after a divorce?

February 9, 2013 | By

Question by Brian J: Is it normal for divorce children to have social issues several years after a divorce?
Is it normal for divorce children to have social issues several years after a divorce? I am 21 now.

Best answer:

Answer by Cham
If it was a bad divorce, yea. Otherwise, statistics prove otherwise as long as parents worked well together.

Add your own answer in the comments!

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Comments (13)

  1. Alimac

    yes, my brother who is 25 is now an alcoholic & I know it’s because of what he remembers during my parents bitter separation. I don’t remember anything but he sure does. He is also not willing to commit to anyone.

  2. Heatherrrrrrrr

    My parents divorced when I was in the 9th grade. I basically had issues with men or a long time. I would do anything for attention because my parents had their own demons and didn’t have time for me. Eventually you move past it and realize you are in control of yourself.

    I’m 37 now. Happily married for 11 years.

  3. Gee

    Usually children suffer the first couple of years (1 – 2) but become normal adults (75% – 80%). The 20 – 25% who don’t do continue to suffer social issues such as being committed to a single spouse, scared of marriage etc.

  4. SGT. Dillers Wifey

    it just depends on the situation and how old you were what the divorce was liek and so on.

  5. JayJay

    Possible. of course. Anything is possible. But why let their relationship drag you down.

    What is in your own head is you..so stop talking yourself in to anxiety

  6. Trying2BNice

    Yes, normal to have social issues.

  7. Nena S

    Yes, it is. Especially if the divorce was a really long or bitter one, and if the child was forced to see or witness violence of any kind.

    I also think that if the child was forced to choose sides or to hear nasty comments the parents made of each other he may have deep wounds.

    I have two younger brothers who are now adults…and neither one is married. They are 32 and 39….and they say they have no interest in settling down at all. Maybe this is a result of what we all lived when our parents got a divorce a long time ago.

    This is why therapy or counseling is beneficial. Many times a counselor can help us to address our feelings and to deal with past hurts and baggage. Good luck.

  8. iamsugaronyourlips

    yes in some cases it is and it can be carried into a realtionship with marriage, bf, gf, with a bad or agree divorce as kids know growing up is mom and dad together family the amercian way and when things change it does affect on how they act, they are reaching out for someone to love them or to fill a void with a habit, good luck to you,

  9. Belinda28

    They can have them for the rest of their lives!

  10. Girly1

    My son doesn’t seem to have any issues. He was 3 when we left his father (he was very abusive) now he is 15 and is a very happy teenager

  11. Ms. M

    Possibly yes…But you can’t blame someone/something from you past for all of your current problems.

    There comes a point when you have to be accountable for your own actions and not anyone elses.

  12. Salacious Crumb

    parents split up and dumped me in a foster home 30 years ago.

    i *still* have trouble forming lasting relationships.

    just keep working through it one day at a time.

  13. Papa Bear

    over 80% develop behavioral problems. But, as an adult, it is you that make your character choices.

    Stop Whining, Start Living
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Stop-Whining-Start-Living/Dr-Laura-Schlessinger/e/9780060838331/?itm=2

    Bad Childhood–Good Life: How to Blossom and Thrive in Spite of an Unhappy Childhood
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Bad-Childhood-Good-Life/Laura-Schlessinger/e/9780641893902/?itm=9